Developing an “earned” media plan

Posted by: in Advertising, Analytics, Communication Strategy, executive insights, Pre-Commerce on July 7, 2014

First published in PRNews

We are often asked our view on the newest social channel, whether it is Vine or What’s App or Vube. Our response is always the same: Where are our customers? The advertising industry created the idea of “media planning.” Their job is to identify the best media outlets to share a brand’s story via paid media. It’s a relatively easy concept, since it is generally based on reach and frequency. My how the world has changed.

In today’s world, advertising is evolving towards ‘storytizing,’ which is driven by earned media, not paid. In earned media, our customers are deciding what is relevant, what they will share and whether they will, quite frankly, pay attention. Reach and frequency are being replaced by engagement and passion, which are far better indicators of shaping behavior and driving sales.

The result is that PR pros and communicators have an opportunity to create the first earned media plans, which tell us where we should invest our time and money. Here is how we can make this happen.

The most important point is that there are only ten types of online media. They include audio, video, forums, blogs, search, social media sites, micro-blogs, images, data/slides and Wikis. Here are the four keys to earned media plans.

1. Rank the ten channels. How many articles, videos, conversations or searches occur by channel? Once you get an aggregate number for each channel by topic, you can then stack-rank the channels. What’s interesting is that when you focus on a topic, e.g. “Brand X” vs. the larger topic, e.g. “nutrition,” you’ll find that the larger category topic is at least 40x higher in volume than your brand, on average.

You now know where the customers are for your category and for your brand and you have a priority order of channels from 1-10.

Note: Remember that the priority order of channels will change by country, topic, issue and brand.

2. Role of channel. Each channel plays a very specific role. Slideshare, which has more than 100 million unique visitors per month, is the top place to access PowerPoints. Customers who want to learn go there often.

The ten channels of online apply in all countries worldwide. Take a brand you work on today and build a simple spreadsheet that shows the social or media sites for each channel. Then, count the video views, search results, image views and continue to quantify results for each channel. Then do this for the larger category your brand is part of. Now rank those channels based on volume and you have just figured out where your customers are most likely to be found. Any social channel or media outlet fits into one of the ten channels. 				        —B.P.

The ten channels of online apply in all countries worldwide. Take a brand you work on today and build a simple spreadsheet that shows the social or media sites for each channel. Then, count the video views, search results, image views and continue to quantify results for each channel. Then do this for the larger category your brand is part of. Now rank those channels based on volume and you have just figured out where your customers are most likely to be found. Any social channel or media outlet fits into one of the ten channels.

Forums are often where communities are teaching each other about topics. Videos are our favorite way to absorb new information, since our brains prefer to learn this way. Search is what we do when we have a question and aren’t sure where to go, often in the beginning of our journey. Wikis are our new Encyclopedia Britannica’s. You get the picture.

Each channel serves a different purpose. We may want to start a conversation on Twitter and link to a slide deck on Slideshare to see if we can get our customers to learn more on a key topic. The key is we start thinking of several steps taken by the customer that shape behavior, not just one.

Note: Ask yourself what the journey is like for a customer to go from zero knowledge to buying your product. What content is important at each step of the journey?

3. Customer need by channel. Our customers want us to have the equivalent of a conversation with them. Even if we don’t really converse, they want to at least know that we understand their needs. For example, if we are on YouTube, most of us go there to either entertain ourselves or to answer a question.

So if you share videos, answer your customers’ questions and then move on. Don’t try to be an entertainer unless you are amazing at it. Avoid slick corporate videos. If you are on SlideShare, you want to see slides that teach you something you didn’t know.

If you are on Facebook, know who you are trying to reach. If you are sharing images that appeal to men and you’re trying to reach women, you’ll turn away your audience. Those types of tiny details show whether you actually know your audience or not. Customers won’t complain, they’ll just avoid channels that don’t get who they are.

Note: Imagine the journey of your customer. Where do they learn first about your brand (search), where do they go to learn (video or SlideShare), where do they talk with their peers (forums) and where do they get subtly influenced by their peers every day (Facebook).

4. Time commitment. You’re not spending money, in most cases, for media. But earned media is an apt title. You do “earn it” by being present, engaging in conversations, sharing relevant information and answering questions the best you can.

It takes a dedicated person or team to do this well. And you need to talk continually about what is working, so you keep getting better at how to reach customers for each channel.

Note: Focus on understanding what excellence is like in each channel for your brand. What works and why? What never works and why?

The result is that you can identify which channels matter for your brand. You can focus on where your customers are and invest your limited time and money into the places with the highest ROI.

You can also tell those folks who randomly ask for a channel to be built that it’s a bad idea if your customers aren’t there in mass, and simply smile, show the data and go to your next meeting.

Enjoy, Bob

 

By: Bob Pearson

Bob is the President of W2O Group, an independent network of digital communications and marketing companies. He is an author, frequent speaker and instructor for Rutgers center for management development. After the success of his book Pre-Commerce, Bob is currently working on a new book on the future of media titled Storytizing that will be available in 2014. Prior to W2O Group, Bob worked as VP of Communities and Conversations at Dell to develop the Fortune 500’s first global social media function -- an industry-leading approach to the use of social media, as highlighted in the best seller, GroundSwell. Before Dell, Bob was Head of Global Corporate Communications and Head of Global Pharma Communications at Novartis Pharmaceuticals in Basel, Switzerland, where he served on the Pharma Executive Committee. He also serves on a variety of Boards in health and technology. Highlights include serving as an original member of the P&G digital advisory board and being appointed by the Governor of Texas to serve as chair and vice chair of the emerging technology fund for the State of Texas.

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Pre-Commerce Check out Chief Technology and Media Officer Bob Pearson's new book, Pre-Commerce, in which he shares ideas for leaders to engage directly with customers to shape their brand and marketplace success. Now available for order on Amazon.com! http://amzn.to/bAmvFN. Join the conversation #precommerce.

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  1. Dave said

    How do you not start with measurable intended outcomes?

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