One week on – a look back at the key highlights from #socialintel14

Posted by: in Social Media Insights & Trends on October 15, 2014

W2O’s 2014 Social Intelligence Summit London brought together some of the most exciting thought-leaders in the industry to kick-start an invigorating dialogue about both the power and potential of social intelligence as it relates to the individual, corporation, and society as a whole. Over 50 guests were welcomed to the invite-only event at the top of London’s iconic City Hall where they took in panoramic views of the city skyline, with many more around the world viewing via live stream.

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The speakers touched on social intelligence from a variety of perspectives from advertising to Pharma, and shared insights into how businesses can (and must) become more empowered to exploit the opportunities the digital age provides. Here are some key takeaways in case you missed out. You can also check out the Pharma Times and Holmes Report posts on the event.

Will Hayward, VP, Europe, BuzzFeed

  • Many people use their social feeds to show who they are, or perhaps more accurately, who they want to be. Bringing them content that allows them to express this helps capitalize on this insight and drive engagement.
  • People are more interested in what others are talking about rather than what traditional news sites are posting.
  • Great advertising should be built for the platform it is meant for, and should fit to what the audience is expecting from that platform.

Phillip Sheldrake, Managing Partner, Euler Partners:

  • Society demands that we understand each other better. Only through contextualizing meaningful information can we create influence and mutual value.
  • We need to move away from the organization-centric view of customers, stakeholders and employees and use social intelligence to create mutual relationships.

Toby Potter, Regional VP Sales, EMEA, DataSift:

  • The digital universe is transparent, observable and measurable. All of the available data points are potentially tiny nuggets of customer insight that go way beyond just the text.
  • Companies must move beyond just looking at and listening to online data towards actually understanding what this data is telling them.

Martin Bryant, Editor-in-Chief, The Next Web  

  • When creating content, the push towards engagement metrics can be a dangerous game. Quality, engaging content is valuable to the consumer. Online advertising is now being measured by time rather than clicks for this reason. This is the ‘marketing model for quality’.

Jessica Federer, Chief Digital Officer, Bayer

  • For a large, global business in which social media is managed by different divisions, managers and teams, how can the data and value from each be integrated? An open, honest approach to promote sharing insights is key.

Bob Pearson, President, W2O Group:

  • There is a shift from “big data” to “small data” where there are a finite number questions, answers and data points we can operate with. As brands begin to become experts in small data, they can implement “forensic analytics” by using small data filters, location-based insights, and predictive analytics to gather information.
  • Any discrete set of people can be turned into a custom search engine, which can help brands understand how they are influencing online conversations & help them change the way they prioritize, engage and activate people in the conversation.
  • Responsive design is changing to responsive experience. More than 50% of traffic to a website comes from a phone or tablet. Inside a company, we can now build “freeways” that standardize data and metrics and deliver what a brand needs to the device of your choice

 

Pre-Commerce Check out W2O Group President Bob Pearson's new book, Pre-Commerce, in which he shares ideas for leaders to engage directly with customers to shape their brand and marketplace success. Now available for order on Amazon.com! http://amzn.to/bAmvFN. Join the conversation #precommerce.

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